Augustus as pontifex maximus

…you predicted the outcome of this conspiracy theory!

Like a fundamental law of physics, the distance between conspiracy theory and conspiracy fact grows shorter and shorter.

Afghanistan

“Former Fed Chairman Arthur Burns said that, “A subtle understanding of economic change comes from a knowledge of history and large affairs, not from statistics or their processing alone.” So far as large affairs go, the recent events in Afghanistan could hardly be any larger.”

NOTE 2 – Why the loss of Afghanistan ultimately ends the Empire, – link, zerohedge.com, – by BY AKRAINER

“[…] it’s the withdrawal operation of war which is the most difficult to implement. The US is learning it the hard way each time.”

5 – link to https://chanakyaforum.com/the-mess-that-is-afghanistan/

Russian_conquest_of_Central_Asia

Wassilij Wassiljewitsch Wereschtschagin
Wassilij Wassiljewitsch Wereschtschagin

By Vasily Vereshchagin – The Yorck Project (2002) 10.000 Meisterwerke der Malerei (DVD-ROM), distributed by DIRECTMEDIA Publishing GmbH. ISBN: 3936122202., Public Domain

Eurasian Heartland

Three times in modern history the “Eurasian Heartland”, a.k.a. Central Asia, has become “[…] a center of great attraction for international observers. NOTE 12 – link “[…] thirteenth and fourteenth centuries when the Mongols […] brought the whole Eurasian lands under their sway and gave the region a unique political unity.” NOTE 12 – link “[…] the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries when the Russians started casting covetous eyes over this region and succeeded in expanding their control over the steppes of Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan and the fertile oasees of Turkestan […]” NOTE 12 – link and then after the Cold War era […] after living for three quarters of a century under the Soviets, the Central Asian states attained freedom and emerged as independent sovereign states.” NOTE 12 – link

12 – link to https://www.jstor.org/stable/41393938, Khan, Hina. “Russian Expansionism in Central Asia and the Region’s Response.” Pakistan Horizon, vol. 49, no. 2, 1996, pp. 33–57. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/41393938. Accessed 29 Aug. 2021.


Sir Halford Mackinder: The “Eurasian Heartland” – A.K.A. – The territory of the former Russian Empire

“Popularized at the beginning of the twentieth century by an eccentric British geographer, Sir Halford Mackinder, geopolitics posits that the earth will forever be divided into two naturally antagonistic spheres: land and sea.”

21 – link to https://www.jstor.org/stable/20049204, Clover, Charles. “Dreams of the Eurasian Heartland: The Reemergence of Geopolitics.” Foreign Affairs, vol. 78, no. 2, 1999, pp. 9–13. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/20049204. Accessed 30 Aug. 2021. – ABSTRACT: “An old political theory, “Eurasianism” is fast gaining converts in Russia’s corridors of power. Its vision of a new Russian-Asian alliance could start World War III.”

The Russian Empire

The Russian Empire[b] was a historical empire that extended across Eurasia and North America from 1721, following the end of the Great Northern War, until the Republic was proclaimed by the Provisional Government that took power after the February Revolution of 1917.[5][6] The third-largest empire in history, at one point stretching over three continents, Europe, Asia, and North America, the Russian Empire was surpassed in size only by the British and Mongol empires.

22 – link to https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Russian_Empire&oldid=1041318909, Wikipedia contributors. (2021, August 29). Russian Empire. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 04:52, August 30, 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Russian_Empire&oldid=1041318909

Zombie Companies

“I grew up in a socialist regime in former Yugoslavia. For as far as I can remember, during the 1970s and 1980s the economy was in a crisis – yet we never had bank failures. What we had was a system where the government and our central bank issued all the credit needed to cover bad debts and keep zombie companies and their creditor banks operating. I think by now this should sound familiar to everyone in the West.”

4 – link to https://thenakedhedgie.com/2020/11/07/about-that-imminent-banking-crisis-dont-hold-your-breath-we-get-inflation-instead/#more-2928

link to off-guardian DOT org 2021/08/26 The war in Afghanistan: -the real crime of the century behind the opioid crisis

About Today’s Featured Image: By Unknown author – Santo Attilio, Augusto, Milano 1902., Public Domain, – * Augustuscapite velato

Augustus, capite velato

RAWLINSON, SIR HENRY CRESWICKE (1810–1895)

RAWLINSON, SIR HENRY CRESWICKE (1810–1895), English soldier and orientalist, was born at Chadlington, Oxfordshire, on the 11th of April 1810. In 1827 he went to India as cadet under the East India Company; and after six years’ life with his regiment as subaltern, during which time he had become proficient in the Persian language, he was sent to Persia in company with some other English officers to drill and reorganize the Shah’s troops. It was at this time that he was first attracted to the study of inscriptions, more particularly those in the hitherto undeciphered cuneiform character. In the course of the two years during which he was in its immediate neighbourhood he transcribed as much as he was able of the great cuneiform inscription at Behistun (q.v.); but the friction between the Persian court and the British government ended in the departure of the British officers.

He was appointed political agent at Kandahar in 1840. In that capacity he served for three years, his political labours being as meritorious as was his gallantry during various engagements in the course of the Afghan War; for these he was rewarded by the distinction of C.B. in 1844. A fortunate chance, by which he became personally known to the governor-general, led to his being appointed, at his own desire, as political agent in Turkish Arabia; thus he was enabled to settle in Bagdad, where he devoted much time to the cuneiform studies which attracted him. He was now able, under considerable difficulties and with no small personal risk, to make a complete transcript of the Behistun inscription, which he was also successful in deciphering and interpreting. Having collected a large amount of invaluable information on this and kindred topics, in addition to much geographical knowledge gained in the prosecution of various explorations (including visits with Layard to the ruins of Nineveh), he returned to England on leave of absence in 1849. He remained at home for two years, published in 1851 his memoir on the Behistun inscription, and was promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He disposed of his valuable collection of Babylonian, Sabaean, and Sassanian antiquities to the trustees of the British Museum, who also made him a considerable grant to enable him to carry on the Assyrian and Babylonian excavations initiated by Layard. In 1851 he returned to Bagdad. 

16 – link to https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/1911_Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica/Rawlinson,_Sir_Henry_Creswicke – 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Rawlinson, Sir Henry Creswicke. (2019, September 18). In Wikisource . Retrieved 22:32, August 29, 2021, from https://en.wikisource.org/w/index.php?title=1911_Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica/Rawlinson,_Sir_Henry_Creswicke&oldid=9606268

M. N. Pokrovskii

“M. N. Pokrovskii (1868 – 1932) is the best-known and most controversial Soviet historian. Although his reputation is primarily that of a militant-perhaps ruthless – polemicist, Pokrovskii was also a conscientious scholar who would not sacrifice intellectual honesty fo the demands of propaganda.”

19 – link to archive DOT org – details – russiain world his – pokr, Russia in world history : selected essays – by Pokrovskii, M. N. (Mikhail Nikolaevich), 1868-1932

NOTES

1 – https://www.jstor.org/stable/497254 – link to Frothingham, A. L. “Ancient Orientation Unveiled: III.” American Journal of Archaeology, vol. 21, no. 3, 1917, pp. 313–336. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/497254. Accessed 29 Aug. 2021.

2 – Why the loss of Afghanistan ultimately ends the Empire, – link, zerohedge.com, – by BY AKRAINER

3 – https://www.jstor.org/stable/23202701 – link to Steinberg, Leo. “ADDENDUM TO JULIUS HELD’S PAPER.” Source: Notes in the History of Art, 8/9, no. 4/1, 1989, pp. 77–79. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/23202701. Accessed 29 Aug. 2021.

4 – link to https://thenakedhedgie.com/2020/11/07/about-that-imminent-banking-crisis-dont-hold-your-breath-we-get-inflation-instead/#more-2928

5 – link to https://chanakyaforum.com/the-mess-that-is-afghanistan/

6 – link to https://www.jstor.org/stable/294357, Lloyd, Robert B. The American Journal of Philology, vol. 93, no. 4, 1972, pp. 616–618. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/294357. Accessed 29 Aug. 2021.

7 – link to Moore, John D. The American Journal of Philology, vol. 93, no. 4, 1972, pp. 612–616. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/294356. Accessed 29 Aug. 2021.

8 – link to https://www.jstor.org/stable/3177206, Rehak, Paul. “Aeneas or Numa? Rethinking the Meaning of the Ara Pacis Augustae.” The Art Bulletin, vol. 83, no. 2, 2001, pp. 190–208. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3177206. Accessed 29 Aug. 2021.

9 – “In Latin, there’s a phrase capite velato meaning literally “with covered head.” The term is used in Roman religious contexts to refer to the act of covering the head with a veil when performing sacrifices. It’s said that the Etruscans by contrast did things ‘Greek-style’ (ie. capite aperto or “with bare head”).” – link to http://www.novaroma.org/nr/Capite_velato

10 – link to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashraf_Ghani, Wikipedia contributors. (2021, August 28). Ashraf Ghani. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 20:52, August 29, 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ashraf_Ghani&oldid=1041132754

11 – link to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Central_Asia, Wikipedia contributors. (2021, August 28). History of Central Asia. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:06, August 29, 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=History_of_Central_Asia&oldid=1041082918

12 – link to https://www.jstor.org/stable/41393938, Khan, Hina. “Russian Expansionism in Central Asia and the Region’s Response.” Pakistan Horizon, vol. 49, no. 2, 1996, pp. 33–57. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/41393938. Accessed 29 Aug. 2021.

13 – link to https://www.jstor.org/stable/196845, “Obituary: Sir Henry Rawlinson.” Journal of the American Geographical Society of New York, vol. 27, no. 1, 1895, pp. 84–85. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/196845. Accessed 29 Aug. 2021. – “Sir Henry Creswicke Rawlinson died in London on the 5th of March, 1895, at the age of eighty-five years […]” – link to https://www.gutenberg.org/files/41343/41343-h/41343-h.htm –

14 – link to https://dokumen.pub/the-boer-war-historiography-and-annotated-bibliography-annotated-edition-0313306273-9780313306273-0750922486-9780750922487.html,

15 – link to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Henry_Rawlinson%2C_1st_Baronet, Wikipedia contributors. (2021, May 21). Sir Henry Rawlinson, 1st Baronet. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 22:29, August 29, 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Sir_Henry_Rawlinson,_1st_Baronet&oldid=1024330534

16 – link to https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/1911_Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica/Rawlinson,_Sir_Henry_Creswicke – 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Rawlinson, Sir Henry Creswicke. (2019, September 18). In Wikisource . Retrieved 22:32, August 29, 2021, from https://en.wikisource.org/w/index.php?title=1911_Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica/Rawlinson,_Sir_Henry_Creswicke&oldid=9606268

17 – link to https://www.jstor.org/stable/4202756, Dobbie-Bateman, A. F. “Michael Pokrovsky.” The Slavonic and East European Review, vol. 11, no. 31, 1932, pp. 187–189. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/4202756. Accessed 29 Aug. 2021.

18 – link to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikhail_Pokrovsky, – perma-link, Wikipedia contributors. (2021, August 20). Mikhail Pokrovsky. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 23:20, August 29, 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mikhail_Pokrovsky&oldid=1039692971

19 – link to archive DOT org – details – russiain world his – pokr, Russia in world history : selected essays – by Pokrovskii, M. N. (Mikhail Nikolaevich), 1868-1932

20 – link to https://www.jstor.org/stable/1407607, Byrnes, Robert F. “Kliuchevskii’s View of the Flow of Russian History.” The Review of Politics, vol. 55, no. 4, 1993, pp. 565–591. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/1407607. Accessed 30 Aug. 2021.

21 – link to https://www.jstor.org/stable/20049204, Clover, Charles. “Dreams of the Eurasian Heartland: The Reemergence of Geopolitics.” Foreign Affairs, vol. 78, no. 2, 1999, pp. 9–13. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/20049204. Accessed 30 Aug. 2021. – ABSTRACT: “An old political theory, “Eurasianism” is fast gaining converts in Russia’s corridors of power. Its vision of a new Russian-Asian alliance could start World War III.”

22 – link to https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Russian_Empire&oldid=1041318909, Wikipedia contributors. (2021, August 29). Russian Empire. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 04:52, August 30, 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Russian_Empire&oldid=1041318909

23 – link to https://www.jstor.org/stable/3021077, Thornton, A. P. “Afghanistan in Anglo-Russian Diplomacy, 1869-1873.” Cambridge Historical Journal, vol. 11, no. 2, 1954, pp. 204–218. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3021077. Accessed 30 Aug. 2021.

Capite Velato: Augustus – You’d be laughed at if…

JLegare


Amateur writer, pianist, denizen of Houston and part-time GLBT activist. Email: james.legare.CEO@jameslegare.us -> I would be delighted to hear from you!


Post navigation


error: Content is protected !!